The Inn- Play or Cornish -Hugg Wrestler By Sir Thomas Parkyns, of Bunny Baronet

The Inn- Play or Cornish -Hugg Wrestler

By Sir Thomas Parkyns, of Bunny Baronet

Transcribed by Ken Pfrenger and Shannon Pfrenger

1. Choose rather to wrestle in a pair of linnen drawers, wide at the knees, easy ty’d above the knees, than in a pair of straight breeches

2. Choose rather to wrestle with narrow low-heel’d shoes, than with broad Heels; for in the first you’ll stand much faster, whether on a Causeway, wet or dry ground; and with narrow-heel’d shoes, you’ll easier disingage, and come off from the hanging trippet. You may put tacks into your heels to prevent your slipping and sliding.

3. Unbutton or untie your shirt neck, with your wristbands, for fear your antagonist should get his hand into your shirt neck or collar, and by holding his arms up, and thrusting his knuckles against your windpipe, you for want of breath be oblig’d to yield him a fall.

4. Camp (as in fencing) or stand low with your toes out, knees bent. and your left elbow close to your body, that he gets not his right hand betwixt your left elbow and side.

The Flying Horse

Take him by the right hand with your left, your palm being upwards, as if you design’d only to shake him by the hand in a friendly manner at the beginning, and twist it outwards, and lift it upwards to make way for your head, and put your head under his right arm-pit, and hold his hand down to your left side; hold your head still backwards, to hold him out of his strength, then put your right arm up to the shoulder betwixt his grainings, and let your hand appear behind past his breech, without taking hold; but if you suspect they’ll cavil at that arm, as a breeching, lay your same arm along his belly, and lift him up as high as your head, and in either hold, when so high, lean backward and thrown him over your head.

(H) The Flying mare

1. Be sure when you take it that you bring your arm past the bent of your arm, under his arm-pit, and let your arm be bent upwards towards your head, and twill keep him from flipping from you.

Hanging Trippet

The hanging Trippet is when you put your toe behind your adversary’s heel, on the same side, with a design to hook his leg up forewards, and throw him on his back.

When you take the hanging trippet, but can’t bring his leg forewards, slide your leg behind his, and let your toe go before his other standing ankle ; bear him backwards, or pluck him hard by his elbow, and throw him backwards.

And the only way to prevent the hanging trippet, trip or draft, is to turn in upon him the contrary way, take him under your arm, or strike his standing leg from under him by the in-clamp, which see.

In-Clamp

Is throwing your heel on the inside of his, as if you would take the in-lock; fall in close to him, bear upon him with your breast and chin, and strike his leg from under him with your heel, as you are directed to so when one back-clamps you. Vide Back Clamp.

Back Clamp

When your adversary back-clamps you, which is when he claps his heel in your ham, with a design to throw you backwards, fall in close to him with your breast and chin, and kick your own breech with your own heel, with his feeble heel in your fort ham; and his head and shoulders will come to the ground first, that throwing him out of the line of direction.

The Pinnion

Is when he has his right arm upon your shoulder, arms, or side, and you get hold of his right wrist with your right hand; lift your arm very high, and your shoulder bone turns his arm together with the twist of your right hand upon his wrist, or his left hand being at your right, take hold of his wrist with your left hand, and without lifting up your right arm, only gripe hard with your left hand, and twist your knuckles backwards, and pluck downwards; and the higher his hand-hold is, (as if at your hair) the easier it is to be taken, but it may be taken from your side by throwing your arm on the inside of his, and plucking his elbow inwards with your other hand, or it may be taken from your elbow by holding his wrist there, and turning your arm over that which is held, or it may be taken as in A the 6th; and be sure when you take this hold, don’t let his wrist go until you are sure of the hold. With whatever arm you take the pinnion, before you bring your hand of that arm to his elbow, which will prevent him from flipping you, then he can neither rise nor fall without your permission, and your other fist is at liberty to box him or throw him forwards.

The Gripes

1. Are nothing but laying your right arm amongst his small ribs, and putting your left hand to your right arm to augment your strength in griping; and when you gripe, get your head on the outside of his arm, then you may lift the better.
2. Never delay the gripe, but get that as soon as you can, and hold him straight, and your head close to his breast, so he does not give you his elbow, and stand low with your knees bent and toes out, and it will prevent buttock, backlock, in-lock, and trip.
3. When one has you up belly to belly, put your knees upon his thighs, and hold your toes wide out, and your legs bent as if you were kneeling; but if you have one up so, throw out your left leg a great height, and fall upon him, and if he puts his legs about your thighs behind you, cover down to throw him upon his back; and when you are both belly to belly, and he puts his right leg behind your left leg to lock you backwards, or the proper term (clamp you) kick your left leg up backwards to your breech, and crush him, bear on his breast close with your chin, and it throws him flat on his back.
4. One having his arm up on your collar, or further down your back, put your hand down to the elbow, with which he holds you, and bring your other arm to his armpit, of which you hold his elbow, and from thence proceed to the gripes, but better in C the first.
5. When both of his arms are at one of yours, one of his being at your armpit, and you put your other arm into the hollow of his, to keep him out, be sure as soon as he moves his hollow arm, gripe him quick, or he may throw his arm over your neck.

A Method for the Inn-Play

Take him by the right hand with your left, your palm being upwards, as if you design only to shake him by the hand in a friendly manner, at the beginning, and twist it outwards, and lift it upwards to make way for your head, and put your head under his right armpit, and hold his hand down to his left side; hold your head stiff backwards, to hold him out of his strength, then put your right arm up to the shoulder between his grainings, and let your hand appear behind, past his breech without taking hold; but if you suspect they’ll cavil at that, as a breeching, lay your same arm along his belly, and lift him up as high as your head, and in either holds; when so high, lean backwards, and throw him over your head, which is called the Flying Horse. Or when you twist him in that hold, he will be apt to bend or lean the other way; hold up and continue your twist, and step sharply with your left foot to his left, then throw your right leg clever behind his, even to his right heel, and at the very same time, with a sharp stroke at the middle of his breast, with yout right elbow, that your right hand may reach his right arm, throw him head and shoulders over your right thigh.

2. With your right hand, having your palm upwards, take him by the left wrist, your little finger, and next about his thumb, his palm being behind, or downward, then thrust your hand down toward his left knee, and turn his fingers up backward, and with your left hand help to hold his fingers, while you shift all your right fingers round his thumb, which hold up, and pain him till you please to throw him forward, by laying your left hand upon his neck.
And if his palm is upwards and yours downwards, you help the twist at the first wtih your left hand, laying your fingers upon his wrist, and your thumb upon his knuckles and pain him easily; put your left hand to his elbow, and pluck it inwards till his arm falls in for the pinnion.

3. Set him your left leg with a step at least three quarters of a yard forwards, bearing your whole weight upon your haunch or leg, leaning backwards with your body, twist your body with your right hand on your left arm; if he trips at your left leg, suddenly step into him with your right (drawing your left backwards) and play your left leg loose behind, with your left arm, as in A the first your right did. You must be sure to make your step with your left leg so near him, so if he does not trip at your left, you may step in at one step easily, with your right to his right, and play the loose leg with your left behind him, even to his left heel, and with a sharp stroke with your left elbow so far over his breast, that your hand may reach his left arm, strike him backward over your left thigh, as in A the first, you threw him over your right.

4. Be sure to keep your left arm close to your body, that he cannot get his arm between your arm and your body, and keep it close, though he puts his on the outside towards your back, for then you are better for the gripes; but if unawares, he gets his arms between yours and your body, crush his, and lift yours up inwards, and when he shrinks to you, take the gripes, but don’t let his arm go that’s between your side and arm, until you have your arm about his middle.
And if he gets his hand between your arm and body towards your side, you may break that hold by securing and thrusting at his elbow, and thrusting your breech out.

5. Holding both your arms higher than your head, bid him take what hold he will, and be sure he’ll come to gripe you; but as soon as his arms are going about you, put your arms under his, and take hold of both your elbows, and lean backwards: let either of your arms go, lean backwards, lifting your other up, and from thence take the gripe.

6. If he takes hold of your right wrist with his right hand, throw your left arm on the inside of his right arm, and take the pinnion, or throw your liberty elbow over his arm, and in for the gripes.

Hold but by one Arm

If your adversary has you by the collar, with your right hand hold him fast there by the wrist, and with your left fort elbow, press on the top of his arm upon his feeble between your right hand and his elbow, or come quick over his wrist for the gripes, following him with your left knee in his right ham, and bear him backwards as in E 11.
Both of your arms being at his breast, or either arm at his elbow, and he bears at your leg hard, and is ready to draw you over either legs, strike off his leg with your contrary knee against his drawing thigh, with the turn of your body; the same way inclamp and catch his standing leg with the same heel inwards, and bearing him backwards, throw him an excellent and ready fall; or if you shift either arm to his back (under-hold) then you are ready for the in-lock backwards or forwards, buttock, or to return to the trip with a draught.
Any of these falls will lodge your knee upon his belly, if you have a mind to disable him for wrestling anymore.

2. When he bears at the outside of your leg, having you by the left arm, take him up under your arm, (Vide B the 4th) if he stops it by putting his arm along your belly then go to the Flying Mare, and if he stops that, give him your elbow under his chin, if he offers to gripe from it.

3. If he has you fast by the side with either arms, with the same arm of which side he holds, then with the inside of your arm near the elbow, hold his close to your body, and by lifting it up, and leaning backwards, and moving round, you may torment him and take the gripes suddenly when it draws him to you; if he has hold of your right side with his right arm, and intends to pluck you to him, turn your right arm over the outside of his right wrist, and in for the gripes.

4. When both of you have hold but by one arm, and that of your left side, bring your right arm for the Flying Mare, or take hold under his right armpit, and your right shoulder to his right, bearing hard against his breast with your right elbow, from thence to the gripes, or your right hand to his right shoulder, as in the C the 3rd, or your right hand cross upon his breast of collar, as in C the 14th; and if his right arm has hold of your left side, you must hold your left elbow close, or as in B the 3rd, or offer to lift his right elbow up to take the gripes; and if he resists you by holding his elbow down, at the same time turn over his wrist with your left arm and for the gripes; but if he has hold of your arm or shoulder, you need not lift his elbow, but turn over his wrist and if his arm is pretty far over your shoulder, lay the edge of your right arm upon his, and with your left laid upon your right, press his down, or put your left arm to his elbow, and your right to his armpit, as in C the 1st, but rather twist his arm as in the latter end of C the 1st.

5. What first hold you have with one hand, get your right hand to his left side, and so to the gripes.

6. If you put your right arm to his left shoulder, and he takes hold of your right arm, with both of his arms, you drop your right to his side, and with your left hand, strike off his elbow; come for the gripes, with your knee in his ham, bearing him backwards, as in C the 4th.

7. If you take hold of his right shoulder, with your left hand, and he has his hands upon your right and left shoulders, drop your right hand to his left side, and over his right wrist, with your left arm, and in for the gripes, with your left knee in his ham, bearing him backwards.

Hold by Both Arms

1. When your adversary has you by both arms, and beareth at your left leg, drop your right arm and take the Flying Mare; or drop and lift him under your arm, especially when he thrusts you backwards: but if he does not bear at your leg, drop your right hand to his right armpit, and your right shoulder and your head close to his shoulder, shift your stand a little towards your left, and if he does not move with you, venture to get the out Back-lock, or the gripes, which is the surest; or get both your arms to one of his thus (especially when his hand is at your shoulder), instead of holding his elbow and armpit, put your left hand on the outside of his right round to the inside of his, a little above his wrist, and there hold, and your right round on the outside of his same arm, towards his shoulder; and with both your arms and shoulders you may twist him, or when one hand is at his elbow, the other ar his armpit, you may throw either of your arms over his neck, according as you feel your advantage; or if his arms are at your side, and you have both arms at his, take your hand from his armpit, and lift under his left arm with your left hand, as in B the 3rd: or when both your arms are at one of his, whether at his shoulder or armpit, be sure to thrust your elbow against his breast hard, and it will prevent his throwing his arm over your neck.

2. If his right hand is at your side, you must hold your left elbow close, and lift his elbow to get the gripes; but if he resists you by holding his elbow down, at the same time, turn over his wrist, and in for the gripes, and when he has you by the left side, with his right hand, and you the same hold of him, at the same time turn over his wrist for the gripes, pluck him to you with your right hand the best way and presently lift him up; but you need not pluck him to you if his right hand is at your left shoulder.

3. The best hold you can get is to hold him by the right elbow with your left hand and your right hand upon his right shoulder, and at the same time that you bear at his leg with your right, hop up with your left, and to stop that to throw you at the same time, he must clap his right knee into your left ham (being the hopping leg) and bear you backwards.

4. And C the 1st, When one gets hold of one of your arms with both of his, if either of his is upon your arm or shoulder, then with your other hand that’s at liberty you may strike at his elbow , break his hold, and come in for the gripes: but if one of his hands has hold under your armpit, you must get your elbow (that is at liberty) into the hollow of his arm that has hold of yours, by the armpit, and thrust your elbow from you, and when you fee your advantage, get the gripes (that is, if he holds his elbow stiff out, but if he holds his elbow low, and stands close to you, turn over his arm, and if high, he can’t avoid the gripes) and in all the parentheses, or between the two half-moons, you must suppose his hand to be upon your shoulder, and not as your armpit.

5. When one offers to come to your side with his left hand to gripe you, let him have fast hold of your side, and at the same time, take the cross buttock from the under-hold, your hand being past the middle of his waist or back, for he’ll humour and lean to the buttock very well, upon striving to get the inside of your arm and side; or put your right arm under his left, and taking hold of his right arm with your right towards his armpit, pluck with your right and left hands, and thrust him down with your shoulder, or lift your right arm up under his left; and when you draw him towards you, then gripe him, or step up in to him at the same time, and lift with your arms and thighs as in D the 5th.

6. If you are fearful your adversary will get the underhold, fly back a little and give him your elbow under his chin, and from thence to his side, with your right

7. If one has your arm between his side and arm, so that you can’t pluck it out, turn your elbow upwards, and your hand downwards and it will turn it out.

8. When you have hold of your adversary by both arms, you may drop either to his sides, and come over his wrist with your other elbow and arm, for the gripes; or drop one arm and go to the Flying Mare, or drop and go both arms to one of his, as is the latter end of C the 1st.

9. If he has you by both your shoulders, with both his hands, and would throw his head in your face, drop your right and take him by the right wrist, and hold your elbow against his face, then lift up your left arm and twist it with your right, and take the Pinnion; or drop your right for the Flying Mare, but if he is a heavy strong man, and will not easily come, but holdeth up his arm, to help you to take the Pinnion, then if you have hold of his right wrist with your right hand, gripe his right wrist hard, being at your left shoulder, and lift up your left hand as high above his right and turn your face and body towards the right; it is the shoulder bone and the turn of your body which turns his hand for the pinnion.

10. Having one by the right elbow and your right hand at his back, step up with your left leg between his legs and with your arms, breasts, and right knee, against the lower part of his thigh, raise him, and throw him, as in D the 4th; and if he thrusts you backwards, when you have this hold, move sideways towards your left, and so to the gripes, but part not with his right elbow till you have them.

11. If you have your right arm at his side, and your left at his elbow, and he lies out, having his head against your breast, throw your elbow arm over his neck, and bear him down, or when one has both his arms at your sides and throws his head against your breast, put your left arm to your right elbow, and your right arm over his head, and press your right elbow upon the brawn of his right arm, or put your right under his left wrist, and lift it up, and so to the gripes, as in B the 3rd.

12. When you have hold of his elbow with your left hand, and your right at his side, be sure you get your right shoulder close to his right shoulder; and if he offers to get his elbow arm around your neck, suddenly throw your head up and body, and prevent him by lifting him out of his strength suddenly, and you may take all these holds from that hold, when he offers to bring his left arm within your right to your side (viz.) the stepping up, Cross buttock, Flying Mare, and the Crush, (i.e.) your right arm being under his left and take hold of his right with your right, as in C the 5th, and elbows to his chin and from his chin to the gripes. 13. Be sure to secure his right elbow with your left hand and keep your left elbow close to your body, that he can’t get his right arm about your back, and get your right to the middle of the small of his back; then you may bear at his leg, and take the buttock, A the 4th, C the 2nd and 10th, and D the 4th, and if they having this hold bear at your leg, hop over and lift their elbow up and get the gripes. Or instead of holding his right elbow with your left hand, put your left hand under his right to the waistband of his breeches, then you can trip, step up, or you may lift your left hand up higher, and crush his right arm between your body and left arm, and from there to the gripes, as in C the 5th.

14. Having one by his right elbow, put your right hand to his elbow or breast, and turn your right elbow as high to his head, and your right arm will be close to the left side of his face; so that if he offers to come over your right elbow, he throws himself, being out of the line of direction: neither can he come in for the gripes. But to break this hold (being one of the best) link both your hands on the outside, a great way above his bent elbow, and draw him down to you and to prevent that, as soon as you feel either of his arms move above your elbow, drop your bent elbow arm to his side and to the gripes or slip your bent elbow under his chin, which in that hold is more natural.

15. If your adversary takes hold of your right wrist, with both of his hands, throw your left arm into the inside of his right arm, and take the pinnion and gripes; or if he holds by your breast, his wrists being cross, to break that hold, take hold of his uppermost wrist, and take the pinnion, or lay both your arms edgeways upon his and crush them downwards towards your breast, fall in for the gripes and cornish, hug belly to belly, lift him and throw him.

The Buttock

Never take the upper hold with either of the arms, over either of his shoulders but when you can safely and advantageously secure his head either backwards or forewards. Never take the in-lock backwards or forwards, or the buttock, from the upper hold; for if your adversary has a loose and tender waistcoat and shirt, you’ll pluck the shirt over his head, and the latter even out of his breeches, which will deceive you, whilst you have a firm hold at his elbow; and the other being loose, will sooner occasion your falling than his, which was my friend Richard Allen’s case, at Repton wrestling. Wheareas if you would give any of the above mentioned falls from the under hold, having fast hold of his elbow, with one of your hands, and the other hand under his arm, past the middle of his waist, let his waistcoat and shirt be ne’er so tender and loose, they can’t deceive you, but you’ll give hime the fall, vide C5

1. Be sure to gripe him hard, and stand with that toe out and leg bent, over which he intends to take the buttock, or back-lock; then with your other knee in his ham, and your arm upon his furthermost shoulder, pluck him backwards; but in a better way to prevent the buttock and backlock, Vide in-lock the 2nd

2. having him by both elbows, turn your right arm over his left, and get fast hold of the middle of his back, and take the buttock at the same time.

3. When your left hand is at his right elbow, and your right at or past the middle of his back or waist, turn in your breech in his lap, and set your right foot beyond his right, and set it fast on the ground, (with all the quickness imaginable, as every thing must be perform’d) but don’t offer to turn him, till you have raised him with your breech in his lap; then pluck his right arm down, and bend with your body, and thrown him over your buttock. But if you offer to throw him but bearing him forward, before you raise him off from the ground, with your breech in his lap, he will be apt to fore-foot you, by putting his right leg before yours, and throw you on your nose.

4. If he offers to get the inside of your arm, that hath hold of his back, as soon as he hath hold of your side, (for then he’s out of line of direction, and humours that fall) take the buttock, being one of the surest holds; or else let him take his inside hold fast, then drop your right arm under his left, and take hold of his right arm pit, and crush his arm, by bearing upon him with your shoulder; take the advantage of the back-lock, Vide G the 1st.

5. When you have thrown him once upon the buttock, the next time, having him by the right elbow and left side, and your right shoulder close to his right, step in with your left leg the inside of his right, and with your left shoulder thrust him, and with your left hand thrust up his elbow, and with your right hand pluck down his side, and the next time step up, and lift with arms, breast and thighs, Vide C the 10th.

6. When he offers to take the buttock, his right hand being at your back or elbow, just as he turns his body, gripe him or lift him out of his strength; and if he takes his hand away from your back, then assure yourself he intends for the flying-mare, then stop with your fist just in the small of his back.

The In-Lock

1. To prevent his lifting you when you would take the In-lock, put your locking toe betwixt his legs as far as you can, until your thigh is close to his grainings, and keep that toe upon the ground; but if he chance to lift you, (as he may if he gripes you hard) hold your other leg wide out, and as soon as he lets you down, take the buttock, or when he lifts you, lock him both ways; and to break that, when you are locked both ways, stretch that leg out (which is lock’d on the inside) with a spring, and pluck him back by the nearest shoulder, you may prevent the In-lock by standing stiff upon your knee-joynt, and turning your toe out.

2. You may break the In-lock by the spring, or turning your toe out; and a little after you spring his leg out, lift him and hitch him up higher, and clap your hand upon his buttock to throw him.

3. If you will let him take the In-lock, lift him, but stand on both legs a while with him up, then let his liberty toe to the ground to ease yourself; then spring his leg out, and hitch him higher and throw him, or rather throw your lock leg out with a spring, and clap him upon the buttocks, or at the same time that he’s steppping up to turn you, standing low before, sink low and yield forwards with that leg he took the lock on; or if you will not lift him, throw your locked leg against his standing toe, and lift with all at the same time a good way.

4. If you spring him out, and he putteth the spring leg behind the other to throw you, keep the leg on the ground that he strikes at; and leaning the contrary way, stretch your leg out, and pluck him backwards by the nearest shoulder.

5. If you have one in the in-lock, and they offer to pull you forwards, at the same time leave your lock, and take the buttock.

6. You must pluck the nearest shoulder, when he would take the back-lock, and sometimes in the in-lock, as in E the 4th, but the farthest shoulder; when he taketh the buttock.

7. If he offers to throw you forwards in the in-lock, clap your fist in the small of his back, and pluck him back by the shoulder, or hop full forwards with your standing leg, bear and press hard yourself upon him, and he will fall under you.

8. Put your right arm over his left shoulder towards his back, and proffer at the in-lock; then put your left arm to your right about his neck, and crush him down, and put your right leg before his.

9. When one hath the in-lock of your right or left leg, at the same time he steps in with his other leg to turn you, throw your liberty leg behind on the inside of his stepping in leg, and you’ll save yourself and throw him on his back. If your adversary taketh the in-lock from the upper hold, be sure you put your head on the outside of his arm, toward his back (otherwise he may catch your head with his head and you), and stand up close with your body to his locking leg, and as soon as he steppeth up with his other leg, and lifteth you up to turn you, as you are turning, lift your locked leg up inwards towards the knee of your other leg (as if you was lifting your leg from off the hanging Trippit at Arms end,) and ’twill throw his locking leg out. Then may you by drawing him up (with lifting) strike at his farthermost leg, and throw him either backwards or forwards and follow him a great way either ways. But if he standeth to throw you forwards, from the in-lock, hop forwards and he cannot throw you; and beware, for if he perceiveth he cannot throw you forwards, he’ll try to throw you backwards as before, and if he taketh the buttock or back-lock, strike at his leg or ham with which he locketh you, with your knee that is at liberty, then you may easily bear him backwards, plucking him by the farthermost shoulder: This is the very best way to throw him that taketh the in-lock, backwards, buttock, or back lock with very little lifting.

The Out Play or Loose Leg

1. There’s a perfect crisis, or true timing in wrestling, as well as in physick, which the Inn-Players, as well as the Out-Players, are to observe, when their adversaries even throw them selves.
The out-players and such would throw their adversary at trip, must observe that when they put themselves out of the line of direction, either by moving at arm’s end, crossing of legs, or counterpoising as they design the bearing, or draught by the arms, or trippping and drawing past their line of direction; then’s the perfect crisis to catch their loose leg and trip, or strike at their standing leg.

2. Stand straight and wide, but not out of your strength with your toe out, and your leg that he trippeth at, somewhat backwards; and as he moves round, move you too, and bear at his leg he moves, when you observe he’s past the line of direction; but don’t bear with your body and arms, until you touch his leg with yours, then do it with a sudden jerk.

3. When you bear at anyone’s leg, and can’t ftch them, don’t take your leg away, but move a little on one side, and take the hanging trip; but then have a care they neither take the buttock, nor you under their arm. 4. When anyone hath your leg up, yours being the inmost, swing it back, and suddenly with your standing leg, strike at his standing leg.

5. If one trips at you, and you think you can’t be quick enough to get the outside of his leg, by the loose leg play, be sure then at the same time you strike at his standing leg; or if one bears at your leg, and you flop it by putting your toe on the inside of his standing leg, as soon as he sets his other leg down, remove your leg from the inside to the outside, and bear at his leg.

6. When one taketh the hanging trippet, bend but your knee forwards against his leg, and it preventeth it; or if you let him take it, turn in to him the other way and take him under your arm, or throw your leg at liberty behind his standing leg.

7. To prevent the trip, stand low with your toes out, and when he offers to kick you, meet his shins with your knees; but if he be ready to draw you, meet his thigh with your contrary knee, and strike his leg off, and at the same time let your arm come down to the middle of his back, when you have struck his leg off, then you are ready for the buttock, in-lock, or stepping up, or in-clamp.

8. But if you intend to shift, and play the loose leg, don’t (stand wide as in). but narroow and loose, and let your leg which he designeth to trip inmost, (which you easily may know by the hold he taketh on you:) stand fast on that leg which you set backwards, and so soon as he toucheth your leg with his foot to draw you over, throw your heel backwards, as if you would kneel upon his leg; then may you, if quick, catch the outside of his leg, or down quick with yours to the ground, and recover your stand.

A Contentious Man

If you have a companion that disturbs your mirth, and wou’d be rid of him, with your let hand take hold of his collar behiind, and with your right put between his legs as far as his codpiece, and lift him up easily, and thrust him out of the room, for he can never turn upon you, but if you lift him too hard, you’ll throw him on his nose.

Boxing

1. By all means have the first blow with your head of fist at his breast, rather than at his face; which is half the battle, by reason it strikes the wind out of his body.

2. If you have long hair, soap it: The best holds are the pinnion with your arms at his shoulders, and your head in his face, or get your right arm under his chin, and your left behind his neck, and let your arms close his neck strait, by holding each elbow with the contrary hand, and crush his neck, your fingers in his eyes, and your fingers of your right hand under his chin, and your left hand under the hinder part of his head; or twist his head round by putting your hand to the side of his face, and the other behind his head.
But if your adversary taketh fast hold with each of his hands of each side of the collar, and thrusteth his thumbs against your throat and windpipe, speedily that you may not want wind, with your right hand hold his fast there by the wrist, and with the left fort elbow, press on the top of his arm upon his feeble, betwixt your right hand and his elbow, or quick over his wrist for the gripes.
Or proceed for the pinnion as in Pag. 43. or if he hath his hands at your hair, and he thrusteth his thumbs in your eyes, you preceed after the foregoing method.

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4 Responses

  1. in the boxing section in the end what move does he refer to when he says, “proceed for the pinnion as in Pag. 43.?”

  2. Hi Dan,

    He is referring to this section:

    The Pinnion

    Is when he has his right arm upon your shoulder, arms, or side, and you get hold of his right wrist with your right hand; lift your arm very high, and your shoulder bone turns his arm together with the twist of your right hand upon his wrist, or his left hand being at your right, take hold of his wrist with your left hand, and without lifting up your right arm, only gripe hard with your left hand, and twist your knuckles backwards, and pluck downwards; and the higher his hand-hold is, (as if at your hair) the easier it is to be taken, but it may be taken from your side by throwing your arm on the inside of his, and plucking his elbow inwards with your other hand, or it may be taken from your elbow by holding his wrist there, and turning your arm over that which is held, or it may be taken as in A the 6th; and be sure when you take this hold, don’t let his wrist go until you are sure of the hold. With whatever arm you take the pinnion, before you bring your hand of that arm to his elbow, which will prevent him from flipping you, then he can neither rise nor fall without your permission, and your other fist is at liberty to box him or throw him forwards.

  3. Derbyshire Record Office (in Matlock, England) has just received the donation of a contemporary set of notes taken from this text. Thanks so much for putting this transcript online – it was useful in identifying exactly what we were looking at:
    http://recordoffice.wordpress.com/2012/08/03/martial-arts-1713-style/

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